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Neighborhood Structure in Relation to Land Use Policies

The City is divided into 34 neighborhoods within five area neighborhood councils. Map 1.2 – Provo City Neighborhoods Map shows the 34 neighborhood boundaries. Map 1.3 – General Plan Map shows the General Plan land use designations for all of Provo. Area Neighborhood Council Maps for the various area neighborhood councils can be found in the map document accompanying the General Plan with its land use designations (Maps 1.4 to 1.8). They include the Central Area Neighborhood Council, Northeast Area Neighborhood Council, Northwest Area Neighborhood Council, Southeast Area Neighborhood Council, and the Southwest Area Neighborhood Council.

Land Use Policies by Area Council and Neighborhood

Map 1.4 - Central Area Neighborhood Council Map (PDF)

CENTRAL AREA NEIGHBORHOODS

Downtown

Franklin

Maeser

Dixon

Franklin South

North Park

East Bay

Joaquin

Timp

The Central Area Neighborhood Council consists of nine neighborhoods. They include the Downtown, Dixon, East Bay, Franklin, Franklin South, Joaquin, Maeser, North Park, and Timp. Five of those neighborhoods are defined as Pioneer Neighborhoods; they are Dixon, Franklin, Joaquin, Maeser, and Timp. The Pioneer Neighborhoods are being targeted for neighborhood conservation by protecting one-family structures. By protecting these homes, the City hopes that the real estate market will stabilize so these homes will be preserved for residential uses and to make it possible and desirable for greater numbers of families to move back into these neighborhoods.

While the single-family dwelling should remain the ideal, this emphasis should not exclude a growing demand for housing types for middle-income individuals who often are priced out of larger family homes and not looking to move into student apartments.

Key policies for the Central Area Council are listed below, with policies to address issues shared, to some degree, within all Central Area neighborhoods, followed by policies of specific importance.

Central Area Guiding Principles, Policies and Goals

The following policies and goals are considered to be shared, to some degree, by all of the Central Area neighborhoods and apply in addition to the policies listed individually for each neighborhood:

1. Residents in the Central Residential Area strongly support establishing and encouraging healthy neighborhoods where residents and property owners live and invest their time, energy, and money because they are family friendly and because financial investment makes economic sense. Actions include:

a. Increasing owner occupancy; and

b. Establishing the one-family dwelling as the principal residential use except in areas designated for higher-density, campus-oriented redevelopment in the Joaquin South Campus Planning Area, the Central Business District zone, Transit Oriented Development zones and areas identified as Transit Oriented Development, Downtown or Mixed-Use on the General Plan Map.

Within Central Residential Area neighborhoods, the City must continue to strongly support and participate in revitalization programs and ensure responsible management of nonresident owned properties through enforcement of the Rental Dwelling Business Licensing ordinance.

2. Strengthen and enhance the Community Oriented Policing, mobile watch, and Neighborhood Watch programs, to increase crime awareness, provide key contact people and a process for reporting crime concerns, and to educate neighbors in neighborhood safety. Report back to the neighborhoods and maintain a responsive relationship between law enforcement and citizens.

3. Pedestrian-friendly design is strongly encouraged to achieve standards of “livability” within urban corridors, with special concern for safety aspects of collector streets for pedestrians and bicyclists, including children using these corridors to access schools, parks, libraries and community-oriented commercial services.

4. Integrity in architecture is strongly urged for any new development or redevelopment; the styles that exist may vary between neighborhoods and within sections of a neighborhood.

5. Evaluate development proposals against the backdrop of the community goals to promote homeowner occupancy, but also with consideration for the character and general scale of housing on surrounding and nearby properties. Projects should reflect the type of housing and architectural style of the surrounding neighborhood and be compatible with the density of the neighborhood. The benefits of redevelopment should be weighed against the current use of the property in order to achieve the most desirable result, but not as a substitute for good maintenance of existing uses through responsible property management and enforcement of the rental dwelling business-licensing requirements.

6. Ensure that businesses comply with zoning laws.

7. Monitor and enforce truck routes for businesses that impact neighborhoods with illegal truck routing, stacking and standing. Continue to improve infrastructure to provide appropriate and adequate street access for trucking, as an alternative to unsatisfactory routes through residential areas. The need for social service clients to reside near public transit or within walking distance of social service agency offices, places of employment and shopping is acknowledged; yet there is concern with concentrating special populations within a particular neighborhood and the possible inequitable burden placed on a neighborhood’s residents as a result of this concentration of high-impact residents.

8. Plan for appropriate transit-oriented redevelopment (TOD), to focus new development and redevelopment along transit corridors, with (a) appropriate residential densities to support transit use, (b) mixing of uses to reduce the need for vehicle trips, and (c) efficient use of infrastructure, in such a way as to further support a reduced reliance on individual automobile trips.

9. Plan for new street connections to open up large blocks of land that have inadequate access for good development or redevelopment.

10. Consider possibilities for grade separation of streets (including pedestrian walkways) and railroad tracks to:

a. Reduce access issues related to trains blocking streets for buses and automobiles using the intermodal station; and

b. Facilitate pedestrian access between the Amtrak station (located north of the railroad tracks on 600 South, west of Freedom Boulevard) and the intermodal station; and

c. Improve safety and access for other walking and bicycling trips to surrounding dwellings, services, and businesses.

11. Work with the railroads to resolve feasibility issues for transit improvements impacting neighborhoods:

a. Impacts to traffic related to neighborhood access and related to scheduling of buses traveling to and from the planned intermodal station and providing local bus service;

b. Safety, noise and aesthetic issues for existing, new and redeveloped residential and business uses in the vicinity of the intermodal station through facility enhancement of the existing heavy rail lines (such as fencing, landscaping, walkways and bicycle paths) and through operations management related to heavy rail use and switching yards; and

c. Work with UTA and railroad companies to improve quiet zones in conjunction with commuter rail.

12. Commercial development fronting an arterial or collector road should not be extended beyond existing property lines to include other lots that do not front on an arterial or collector road. The rear yard of a lot fronting on a local street should not be used to extend the depth of a lot used for commercial purposes.

13. Study the feasibility of establishing a transferable development rights (TDR) program to increase owner occupancy in targeted areas. Potential TDR sending and receiving areas should include, but not be limited to, the North Joaquin, Interim Transit Oriented Development and Center Street areas, including West Center Street to I-15.

14. Structures originally built for residential use on the streets listed below should be allowed to retain commercial uses. A feasibility study should be conducted of historic and other aesthetically valuable structures along arterial and collector roads that have been identified for mixed-use and commercial redevelopment to determine costs and viability of their relocation within adjacent neighborhoods as a tool for neighborhood revitalization programs.

Center Street: 100 East to 400 East and 600 West to 800 West

500 West: 200 North to 500 North

University Avenue: 500 North to 960 North

15. Freeway-oriented commercial zoning should be initiated for property adjacent to I-15, excepting the property to the southeast of the intersection of 1860 South and I-15. Planning for the area should identify and implement mechanisms to ensure that frontage properties are developed with adequate street access to the north and south.

16. Center Street, between 500 West and the railroad tracks, should be studied and planned to capitalize on the reconstruction of the Interstate 15 Center Street interchange. An analysis of appropriate mixed-use and commercial land uses, densities and other factors should guide the development of any zoning ordinances regulating this area.

Key land use policies for individual neighborhoods within the Central Area Council are listed below by neighborhood:

Downtown Neighborhood

The Municipal Council adopted the Downtown Master Plan on April 7, 2015, as a component of the General Plan. The Downtown Master Plan provides specific details on the existing conditions of the Downtown Neighborhood. Guidance for future land uses and development patterns are detailed in the Downtown Master Plan. Additionally, it sets forth urban design criteria and gives direction for parks and open space as well as transportation patterns and circulation. The Downtown Master Plan is incorporated into the General Plan by reference, and it should be adhered to as redevelopment projects within the area are reviewed.

Dixon Neighborhood

One of the first areas settled in historic Provo, Dixon Neighborhood is adjacent to Downtown and has a rich heritage. It offers an attractive and sustainable mix of housing focused on long-term homeownership while meeting the needs of a variety of short-term residents, both homeowners and renters. Dixon Neighborhood is a walkable community due to its proximity and convenient access to numerous and varied destinations in the neighborhood and nearby neighborhoods, including parks and trails, schools, churches, libraries, community centers, arts, entertainment and recreation venues, government and business offices, grocery and other shopping opportunities, medical centers and a post office. Close to public transportation, Dixon offers a safe, attractive, atmosphere of large, tree-lined streets, sparse traffic and friendly neighbors. Dixon residents envision the neighborhood as a family-oriented area with one-family households, residing in one-family dwellings, with or without accessory apartments.

Goals of the Neighborhood

1. Increase permanent residents to support community, school and a mix of ages.

2. Improve the housing choices to accommodate the people who do want to stay. Provide good housing options for all life stages.

3. Maintain the family nature of the neighborhood while welcoming people of various household structures. Maintain and improve on the great quality of life while addressing the changing development pressures and resident preferences.

4. Maintain and improve on the historical feel, sense of place, and heritage of the area. Become the premier location for families and individuals looking for a semi-urban lifestyle. (As properties within the neighborhood redevelop, architectural styles to be reflected include Victorian, Victorian Classic, Modern Victorian, Tudor Revival, bungalow, Salt Box, Post-War and Modern Ranch in order to preserve the historic character of the community.)

5. Support and encourage quality businesses that serve the needs of the residents. Improve the pedestrian-friendly aspects of our neighborhood.

6. Improve the sense of safety and well-being of people out in the neighborhood.

7. Improve the transportation options for residents. Improve the feeling of belonging and of mutual concern among residents, particularly across demographic differences.

8. Improve the two existing schools (Dixon Middle School and Timpanogos Elementary) to meet the demands of new population growth and to replace, or bring up to code, existing structures.

Key Land Use Policies to Achieve the Goals of the Dixon Neighborhood

1. Protect viable, significant areas of one-family structures in areas designated as Residential (R).

2. Restrict commercial uses along Center Street from 500 West to 1000 West from extending into the Residential (R) General Plan designation.

3. Ensure that approved redevelopment projects will move Dixon Neighborhood forward to realize the neighborhood vision.

4. Study the feasibility of placing landscape medians in Center Street from 500 West to 900 West to enhance the proposed design corridor.

5. Study the feasibility of conducting a historic designation survey in the Dixon Neighborhood.

6. If redevelopment of the Fresh Market Commercial Center—located between 600 West and 500 West Center Street—should occur, the plan should provide for a more appropriate transition between commercial and residential uses on 600 West. Loading docks, block walls and other uninviting design is strongly discouraged. Preferably, residential development should front 600 West.

7. Support the Gateway, West Gateway, Freeway Commercial, and Freeway Commercial Two zones, to transform Center Street into a fitting entry into the City and to take full advantage of the prime freeway access of the Draper Lane area. Consider a pedestrian bridge to connect Draper Lane to the rest of the neighborhood near 200 North.

8. Consider Complete Street principles when planning any road maintenance or improvement.

East Bay Neighborhood

1. Restrict the heavy commercial and heavy manufacturing uses from encroaching into the retail shopping areas.

2. Evaluate the Planned Industrial/Commercial Zone to determine whether greater distinction should be drawn between the industrial park development and the commercial development, using East Bay as the foundation for the evaluation. Distinction in principal uses, conditional uses, sign standards and colors, and traffic circulation may be appropriate for greater distinction between the industrial and commercial areas.

3. Evaluate the East Bay covenants, conditions and restrictions (CC&Rs) for conflicts with the PIC zone language and consider revisions that impact the City’s issuance of permits in conformance with City ordinances that may conflict with the East Bay covenants.

4. The Neighborhood Chair will continue to serve on the East Bay Association Board of Directors during the development phase of East Bay and work toward establishing and maintaining long-term, successful businesses in the planned industrial/commercial park.

5. Continue to encourage quality development and redevelopment near the Provo Towne Centre Mall, including an attractive, well landscaped frontage along University Avenue, to create a more significant entrance to this vital retail anchor. Uses that complement and support the shopping mall should be actively sought and encouraged. Ordinances should be reviewed for uses that could detract from the long-term success of the Provo Towne Centre Mall. Design to facilitate traffic circulation between the mall and these University Avenue businesses should be required during the development process.

Franklin Neighborhood

Neighborhood Vision, Challenges, and Goals

Franklin Neighborhood encompasses the first permanently settled area in what is now Utah County. The Franklin Neighborhood Plan was adopted by the Municipal Council, and it is incorporated in the General Plan by reference. It details existing conditions in the neighborhood and provides additional detail on acceptable future land uses. It should be closely followed as properties redevelop.

Franklin South Neighborhood

Goals of the Franklin South Neighborhood are as follows:

1. Add another access across the railroad tracks;

2. Develop intermodal plans and design all development around the plan;

3. Develop better road infrastructure and access to the neighborhood;

4. Increase homeowner occupancy;

5. Eliminate existing blighted, high-density properties and identify locations for appropriately located and designed public recreational parks to serve this densely populated neighborhood;

6. Complete sidewalks and off-site improvements to provide walkability throughout the neighborhood and adjoining communities.

Challenges for the Neighborhood

Franklin South Neighborhood is one of Provo’s more population-dense neighborhoods, yet lacks recreation facilities for children and families. Children are bussed to schools outside the neighborhood, and central park space is not available. Neighborhood cohesion that builds on the strengths of diversity is also a challenge.

Franklin South needs the cooperative efforts of the City and other agencies to achieve appropriate new development and redevelopment. The neighborhood could significantly benefit from the Provo Redevelopment Agency homebuyer assistance programs and other related neighborhood programs.

Franklin South is the gateway to the Provo Towne Centre Mall. Transportation connections between this neighborhood and the mall and other commercial services should include walkways, bikeways, traffic calming measures, and transit. Improvements for pedestrian access from the neighborhoods to the mall should be identified and implemented.

Key Land Use Policies for the Franklin South Neighborhood

1. Protect viable, significant areas of one-family structures in areas designated as Residential (R) on the General Plan Map.

2. Encourage an open public place or a small park for any large-scale redevelopment within the neighborhood.

3. New development should be coordinated with the intermodal center and related street network and redevelopment guidelines, including mixed-use, transit-oriented development in appropriate locations. Residential development in mixed-use projects should be developed above the ground floor. Commercial development on ground floors within mixed-use zoning should be carefully sited to ensure maximum success and long-term viability with the neighborhood.

4. Develop a dialogue between citizens, the City and social service agencies.

5. Continue to evaluate how eligible neighborhoods may effectively utilize neighborhood revitalization initiatives, such as Community Development Block Grant (CDBG).

Joaquin Neighborhood

Vision, Challenges, and Goals of the Joaquin Neighborhood

The Joaquin neighborhood has long been a desirable area to live in Provo due to its excellent location, peaceful tree-lined streets and rich architectural history, but has experienced special challenges due to its proximity to Brigham Young University. The Joaquin Neighborhood Plan was adopted by the Municipal Council, and it is incorporated into the General Plan by reference. It further describes the existing conditions of the Joaquin Neighborhood and provides guidance for implementation of future land uses. The Joaquin Neighborhood Plan should be closely followed when considering redevelopment of properties in the neighborhood.

Maeser Neighborhood

Vision, Challenges, and Goals of the Maeser Neighborhood

The Maeser neighborhood is one of the Pioneer Neighborhoods of Provo, with a desirable central location and pleasing architectural styles that reflect the history of the area. The Maeser School is a valuable historical architectural resource and a reflection of community values through the efforts to preserve this structure, which have resulted in an adaptive reuse of the school building and surrounding grounds to one-family dwellings. The Maeser Neighborhood Plan was adopted by the Municipal Council, and it is incorporated into the General Plan by reference. It further describes plans for projected growth, goals and objectives that reflect the needs of the areas, and a discussion on guiding principles for the residents of the Neighborhood. The Maeser Neighborhood Plan should be closely followed when considering redevelopment and land use decisions in the neighborhood.

North Park Neighborhood

Vision, Challenges, and Goals of the North Park Neighborhood

The North Park Neighborhood shares many of the characteristics of the other Central Area neighborhoods. There is a desire to reestablish one-family occupancy and opportunities for home ownership and residency by families and individuals who can make a long-term commitment to the neighborhood. A high rate of rental properties and a general decline in the condition of many properties provides a challenge for the revitalization of the neighborhood. The architectural character of historic homes contributes character to the neighborhood, and there is a desire to see these homes preserved and restored.

1. Increase the number of owner-occupants to stabilize and strengthen the neighborhood.

2. Improve and support the availability of off-street parking and enforce current requirements.

3. Improve the pedestrian-friendly and safety aspects of the neighborhood.

4. Reduce crime and implement programs to have a drug-free neighborhood.

5. Preserve and maintain the family-oriented public recreational facilities in the neighborhood, including Exchange Park, North Park, Paul Ream Wilderness Park, and Riverside Park.

6. Maintain the architectural heritage on University Avenue that is a unique part of Provo’s heritage.

Key Land Use Policies to Address the Goals of the North Park Neighborhood

1. Protect viable, significant areas of one-family structures designated as Residential (R) on the General Plan Map. Promote owner occupancy throughout the neighborhood by limiting new development to detached, one-family homes and the rehabilitation of existing one-family homes, where designated as Residential (R) on the General Plan Map.

2. Study the feasibility of doing a historic designation survey in the North Park Neighborhood with the goal of preserving homes and buildings of historic and architectural value that help to create the character of the neighborhood.

3. Should redevelopment occur, efforts should be made to incorporate historic structures into the development or to relocate them.

4. Encourage responsible property management through the enforcement of the Rental Dwelling Business Licensing ordinance and other applicable zoning ordinances.

5. Develop a dialogue between neighborhoods, the City, landlords, and social service agencies to review concerns and complaints about social service clients living in the neighborhood. Evaluate the service the agencies are providing, the degree of responsibilities for clients by these agencies, and possible changes to reduce neighborhood resident complaints and concerns resulting from these services.

Timp Neighborhood

Vision, Challenges, and Goals of the Timp Neighborhood

The Timp Neighborhood is considered one of the most walkable neighborhoods in Provo. With this, the neighborhood emphasizes creating an inviting environment for residents with a diverse range of ages, income levels, and backgrounds. The Timp Neighborhood has protected the unique residential attributes that allow families and individuals to thrive in a close-knit environment while still enjoying the social and commercial benefits of walkability to downtown Provo and surrounding areas. The Timp Neighborhood is home to, and located near, some of the most historically significant sections of downtown. Restoring and maintaining the historic features of the neighborhood and continuing emphasis on owner occupancy will provide balance and stability to this neighborhood. The Timp Neighborhood Plan was adopted by the Municipal Council, and it is incorporated into the General Plan by reference. It further describes the existing conditions of the Timp Neighborhood and provides guidance for implementation of key land use policies and future land uses. The Timp Neighborhood Plan should be closely followed when considering restoration and redevelopment of properties in the neighborhood.

Map 1.5 - Northeast Area Neighborhood Council Map (PDF)

NORTHEAST AREA NEIGHBORHOODS

Edgemont

North Timpview

Sherwood Hills

Indian Hills

Rock Canyon

The Northeast Area Neighborhood Council consists of five neighborhoods: Edgemont, Indian Hills, North Timpview, Rock Canyon, and Sherwood Hills. Key policies for the Northeast Area Council are listed below, with policies to address issues shared, to some degree, within all Northeast Area neighborhoods, followed by policies of specific importance, by neighborhood.

Northeast Area Guiding Principles, Policies and Goals

The following policies and goals are shared, to some degree, by all of the Northeast Area Neighborhoods, and they apply in addition to the policies listed for each individual neighborhood:

1. Protect viable, significant areas of one-family structures in areas designated as Residential (R) on the General Plan Map.

2. Maintain the Residential (R) General Plan designation with one-family residential development with a goal of increasing the amount of owner-occupied housing units.

3. Any new development within areas with the Provo City General Plan Map designation of Developmentally Sensitive (DS) will be subject to studies of potential geologic hazards, geotechnical constraints, slopes or other conditions, as required by the City Engineer or State Geologist. This will ensure that sensitive lands are appropriately developed or, where necessary to protect people, property or significant natural features, withheld from development.

4. Establish policies and ordinances for Rock Canyon that limit commercial activity and development as well as protect and enhance the area as a citywide recreational asset.

5. Any properties within the Northeast Area identified for possible future annexation in the Annexation Policy Plan designated as “Agricultural” on the General Plan Land Use Map, shall be assigned to the Open Space, Preservation, and Recreation (OSPR) Zone upon being annexed.

Key land use policies for individual neighborhoods within the Northeast Area Neighborhood Council are listed below by neighborhood:

Edgemont Neighborhood

1. Maintain all existing one-family residential areas of the neighborhood as one-family, detached housing. Duplexes, twin homes, condominiums, and apartments are not compatible with the goals for this neighborhood. Housing should be developed at the scale of surrounding existing development. The neighborhood may consider design regulations to control housing scale in established residential areas to prevent incompatible infill development.

2. Limit rural agricultural tracts south of Timpview High School to one-family residential development. If developed as performance developments, they should be limited to one-family dwellings.

3. Prohibit existing commercial and office nodes from expanding into the Residential (R) General Plan designation.

4. Retain the auto repair service and gas station property on the northeast corner of 2950 North and Canyon Road as Residential (R) on the General Plan Map to reflect neighborhood concern that this property not be sold for commercial redevelopment or change in commercial use. The City has approved a PRO (Project Redevelopment Option) zone to allow facility expansion and redesign of the existing, nonconforming business within the original parcel boundaries, using the PRO process. This action recognizes that this business has provided a needed service to the community for many years, but is in need of modernization to compete economically and to better integrate into this substantially one-family residential area.

a. This action is not intended to encourage or facilitate further commercial development at this intersection, but to allow this nonconforming use to establish as a conforming business through the PRO process. It is not the Council’s intent to amend the General Plan Map upon rezoning, but to maintain the R map designation.

b. The adjoining lot(s) under the same ownership, fronting 2950 North, would remain designated as Residential (R) for the purpose of one-family residential use. The General Plan boundary for expansion of the existing commercial use is considered to be the existing property line.

5. The property located generally at 3645 North Canyon Road, now used for a car wash, may be redeveloped for low-density residential use (R1.10 Zone) with areas exceeding 30 percent slope restricted from development. Any development must be compatible in density, scale and design with adjoining residential development. Consolidating the property with additional property is encouraged.

6. The Fire Station along Canyon Road should be designated as Residential on the General Plan Map. If the property is sold by the City, it should be developed comparable to the R1.10 Zone.

Indian Hills Neighborhood

1. Prohibit development in the unincorporated USDA Forest Service land east of Indian Hills within the Provo City General Plan Map designation of Developmentally Sensitive (DS).

2. Work with the Provo City Traffic Engineer to explore the possibilities of developing a traffic-calming improvement plan to address issues of traffic speed concerns, particularly on Navajo Lane and Indian Hills Drive.

North Timpview Neighborhood

1. Prohibit new Agricultural (A) designations, within the City limits, which grant animal rights, except where agricultural use is established on property that may be annexed into City limits.

2. Strive for increased owner occupancy. Density higher than R1.10 zoning is not within the goals of this neighborhood.

3. Although not shown on the map as PF – Public Facilities, the anticipation is that the East Lawn Cemetery will expand in a manner consistent with the PF designation. Provo City recognizes the need to appropriately expand the East Lawn Cemetery to provide services for Provo’s population and does not intend this expansion to require an amendment to the Provo City General Plan.

4. Work to establish an infrastructure improvement plan that focuses on installing, replacing, or repairing sidewalks and streetlights. Also, improve access of private residences to sewer laterals to replace existing septic systems.

Rock Canyon Neighborhood

See the Country Club Manor Specific Development Plan for information pertaining to Rock Canyon Neighborhood.

Sherwood Hills Neighborhood

New development above the 5,200-foot elevation within the Provo City General Plan Map designation of Developmentally Sensitive (DS) is restricted due to conditions described in Chapter 4, Natural Resources and Environment, of this General Plan.

Map 1.6 - Northwest Area Neighborhood Council Map (PDF)

NORTHWEST AREA NEIGHBORHOODS

Carterville

Grandview South

Rivergrove

Grandview North

Riverbottoms

Riverside

The Northwest Area Neighborhood Council consists of six neighborhoods: Carterville, Grandview North, Grandview South, Riverbottoms, Rivergrove, and Riverside. Key policies for the Northwest Area Council are listed below. Policies to address issues shared, to some degree, within all Northwest Area neighborhoods, are followed by policies of specific importance, by neighborhood.

Northwest Area Guiding Principles, Policies and Goals

The following policies and goals are shared, to some degree, by all of the Northwest Area Neighborhoods, and they apply in addition to the policies listed for each individual neighborhood:

1. Protect viable, significant areas of one-family structures within areas designated as Residential (R) on the General Plan Map.

2. Maintain the Residential (R) General Plan designation with one-family residential development.

Key land use policies for individual neighborhoods within the Northwest Area Neighborhood Council are listed below by neighborhood:

Carterville Neighborhood

1. Property designated as Mixed-Use (M) on the General Plan Map should not develop under mixed-use guidelines until an area master plan has been established. The area master plan should specifically address how development interacts with the Provo River frontage. Policies that encourage a pedestrian-friendly, mixed-use Riverwalk area are highly encouraged.

Grandview North Neighborhood

1. This neighborhood is well established and expected to remain consistent in its uses and continue to meet the guiding principles for the Northwest Area.

Grandview South Neighborhood

1. This neighborhood is well established and expected to remain consistent in its uses and continue to meet the guiding principles for the Northwest Area.

2. Plan, adopt, and implement a landscaping plan for property adjacent to the 1375 West corridor in order to beautify the area and mitigate safety hazards created by vegetative overgrowth into the sidewalk and right-of-way.

Riverbottoms Neighborhood

1. Maintain the Residential (R) General Plan designation with one-family residential development, except as otherwise provided. All new residential developments along University Avenue should be one-family residential development.

2. Any properties north of 4800 North and west of University Avenue that consist of 20 acres or more in size may develop as independent research and business park. Land assembly may be required for smaller parcels. Individual lots along 50 West or Edgewood Drive should be redeveloped for research and business park uses. The entire residential uses that are currently zoned A1.1 should be redeveloped, or none of it should. It is an already isolated residential enclave, and should not be further encroached upon, making it more difficult and costly to redevelop as research and business park. This area should be developed to the same standards as those required in the Riverwoods Research and Business Park.

3. Designate the property located at approximately 5600 North, east of University Avenue and Canyon Road, as Residential (R). Approximately two acres of the site are flat and developable if adequate access can be provided, subject to the Sensitive Lands ordinance as it may apply to property proposed for development or access. The remaining four acres are too steep to develop, and are in the middle of a natural drainage channel.

4. The northeast corner of 4800 North University Avenue (4878 N. University Ave.), containing approximately two acres, to be developed with a Commercial use.

5. The proposed design corridor along 4800 North should be extended to Canyon Road.

See Village at Riverwoods Specific Development Plan for documents.

Rivergrove Neighborhood

1. Provide alternative land use designations for the mobile home park at Columbia Lane and Grandview Lane as Commercial (C), Residential (R), or Mixed-Use (MU). Any of these designations could be appropriate in this location, and would facilitate the redevelopment of that parcel. Whatever is approved on this site should have landscaping along the street frontage consistent with the residential developments on the northeast and southwest corners, and commercial buildings should be designed to fit in with the residential character.

2. Encourage the commercial redevelopment of Columbia Lane from State Street to the residential development just south of Grandview Lane. Sidewalk, curb, and gutter should be installed for safety and to prohibit parking backing out onto Columbia Lane. Land uses should be better screened in the future or promote retail rather than automotive-related uses. The Council may consider a design corridor for this area. Bike lane planning should be included in the development of a design corridor plan and ordinance.

3. Encourage the improvement of the neighborhoods by supporting policies and ordinances that attract a mix of family types, including retirees and singles, increasing owner occupancy, encouraging neighborhood activities, requiring the proper maintenance of homes, and landscaping.

4. Work with law enforcement programs, such as Community Oriented Policing (COP), to decrease illegal activities within the neighborhood.

5. Work to develop and implement an infrastructure improvement plan to install sidewalks in areas that do not have them.

6. Preserve and maintain park and open space by working with the Parks Department to repair, maintain, improve and increase recreational facilities within the neighborhood.

7. Commercial uses should not encroach into established residential areas.

Riverside Neighborhood

1. All undeveloped land along the University Avenue corridor, lying between 50 West and 100 East, may be developed for professional offices within the Commercial designation, while any land west of 50 West and any land east of 100 East should be one-family detached homes. This presents a consistent University Avenue business corridor, while providing high-quality, low-density housing for Provo residents, and supports Provo’s goal to encourage new neighborhoods of one-family detached homes.

2. All undeveloped land lying between 3300 North and 3080 North, and east of 100 East, may be developed for professional offices within the Commercial designation.

3. All new professional office use must be consistent in architecture and style to existing office buildings to provide a planned presentation.

4. All efforts must be made to preserve the natural trees, foliage and land topography in order to maintain a mature, natural look and feel to the Riverside area.

5. In order to prevent excessive traffic in residential areas, direct and indirect access should not be permitted or accommodated between University Avenue and 3700 North through residential neighborhoods.

6. The Mixed-Use (M) designation should not develop under mixed-use guidelines until an area master plan is established. The area master plan should specifically address how development interacts with the Provo River frontage. Policies that encourage a pedestrian-friendly, mixed-use river walk area are highly encouraged.

Map 1.7 - Southeast Area Neighborhood Council Map (PDF)

SOUTHEAST AREA NEIGHBORHOODS

Foothills

Provost

University

Oak Hills

Provost South

Wasatch

Pleasant View

Spring Creek

The Southeast Area Neighborhood Council consists of eight neighborhoods: Foothills, Oak Hills, Pleasant View, Provost, Provost South, Spring Creek, University, and Wasatch. Key policies for the Southeast Area Neighborhood Council are listed below by neighborhood. Key policies for the Southeast Area Council are listed below, with policies to address issues shared, to some degree, within all Southeast Area neighborhoods, followed by policies of specific importance, by neighborhood.

Southeast Area Guiding Principles, Policies, and Goals

The following policies and goals are shared, to some degree, by all of the Southeast Area Neighborhoods, and they apply in addition to the policies listed for each individual neighborhood:

1. Viable, significant areas of one-family structures within the Residential (R) should be protected for continued one-family use.

2. Maintain the Residential (R) General Plan designation with one-family residential development, except where specified otherwise.

3. Any proposed development within Developmentally Sensitive areas will be subject to studies of potential wetlands, floodplains or other conditions, as required by the City Engineer or by any State or Federal regulatory agency with jurisdiction to ensure that sensitive lands are appropriately developed or, where necessary to protect people, property or significant natural features, withheld from development.

4. Establish policies and ordinances that protect and enhance Slate Canyon.

South State Street Corridor Development Policies

South State Street is the main entrance into southeast Provo City and traverses from the intersection of State Road (SR) 75 (Springville City Limits) to 300 South. From approximately 900 South to the city limits, State Street divides the Provost South and Spring Creek Neighborhoods from each other.

The intent of this policy is to create a mixed-use corridor with uniform public and private property design and development standards that are conducive to both of the adjacent neighborhoods and that will enhance the character of South State Street. The policy encompasses all properties located between the existing railroad tracks west of State Street and all properties adjacent to State Street on the east side.

Due to the length and character of South State Street, the corridor is divided into two large areas for discussion of land use policy. These areas are described as Area A (North of 1860 South) and Area B (South of 1860 South). The Public Way Design Standards are for the entire length of South State Street.

Public Way Policies

Policies should address uniform public way improvements for the entire corridor including the following:

1. All new and existing utilities should be placed underground when development occurs where feasible.

2. The street design (acceptable to UDOT and Provo City by mutual agreement) should include, but not be limited to: uniform curb, gutter, sidewalks, street width, street lighting, landscaping, street signage, etc. and provide for efficient movement of traffic and pedestrians.

Key land use policies for individual neighborhoods within the Southeast Area Neighborhood Council are listed, below, by neighborhood:

Foothills Neighborhood

Vision, Challenges, and Goals of the Foothills Neighborhood

Over time, the Foothills neighborhood has become a diverse neighborhood including homes ranging in size from small, post-war starter homes to large luxury homes. The neighborhood includes a small but distinct commercial zone and a strip of high-density student housing. This mix of uses creates advantages and challenges for the neighborhood.

Foothills is an ideal place for young couples just starting out to rent or even own a small home, duplex, or basement apartment as they transition toward permanent housing. At the same time, there is a significant number of families that have lived in the neighborhood for decades. New, larger homes on the east side of the neighborhood are also very attractive to established families that are looking for a place to sink roots.

Additionally, baching singles rent student housing along 450 North.

The vision for this neighborhood is to maintain the current delicate balance of residents and uses in a way that is sustainable economically and socially. Some of the keys to making this viable:

1. Attracting permanent residents to the neighborhood is a critical focus. Having permanent residents provides community stability and support for those who are just starting out.

2. Encourage policies that prompt baching singles to reside in the South Campus Planning Area and reclaim dwellings for one-family occupancy.

3. Ensure that all property owners are aware of the neighborhood rules and municipal regulations.

4. Enforce occupancy and Rental Dwelling Licensing rules.

Past efforts to maintain this balance have focused on stricter enforcement of zoning requirements, modification of parking requirements and zones, and the implementation of restrictive covenants in new developments. The intent of these efforts has been to make housing pleasant and attractive to families appropriate to the size of the home as well as to providing adequate, usable, and attractive housing in areas designated for baching singles.

It is the goal of the neighborhood to work with owners of condominium complexes in the heart of the neighborhood to encourage the unit owners to abide by occupancy limitations and other noise, nuisance, and parking issues as regulated by Provo City Code.

The City-owned property near 1480 North may be developed as a park in the future.

Goals of the Foothills Neighborhood

1. Increase owner occupancy within the neighborhood.

2. Attract longer-term residents to increase neighborhood stability.

3. Foster a sense of community.

4. Find a permanent resolution to the occupancy violations and concerns within the condominium complexes.

5. Ensure that existing designated student housing remains an attractive option for baching singles.

New residential developments should focus on creating housing that will encourage permanent residents.

1. Promote owner occupancy throughout the neighborhood by limiting new development to detached, one-family dwellings.

2. Maintain all existing one-family residential areas of the neighborhood as one-family detached housing. Higher-density residential housing, such as duplexes, twin homes, condominiums, and apartments, is not compatible with the goals for this neighborhood.

3. It is the intent of Council that a boundary between the higher-density uses of Brigham Young University (BYU) on the west side of 900 East and the one-family residential uses of the Foothills neighborhood be maintained. This plan designates 900 East as the boundary that best respects existing uses and protects both uses from the incompatibility of having high-density residential or commercial uses next to one-family residential uses. Because 900 East provides the most logical buffer between these two incompatible uses, this plan designates that residential properties on 900 East, where currently zoned and used for one-family detached homes, should be maintained as one-family detached housing. Higher-density residential housing, such as duplexes, twin homes, condominiums, and apartments, is not compatible with the goals for this area.

4. Commercial and other nonresidential development not be allowed to expand.

5. Residential project plans for property under the Residential (R) General Plan Map designation east of the Seven Peaks Water Park Resort may develop with a variety of housing types, including one-family detached, one-family semi-detached (twin homes), or one-family attached (townhomes or condominiums not stacked above or below each other). Multiple-family configurations incorporating stacked units may be suitable if designed with dispersed massing (not centrally located in a few buildings). Any project should be designed with sensitivity to the adjacent hillside and should integrate with existing residential development to the north. The project design should not draw attention to itself but rather seek to blend the new residential use with the surrounding land uses.

Oak Hills Neighborhood

1. Limit development east of 1550 East to one row of homes one lot in depth, with no flag or panhandle lots.

Pleasant View Neighborhood

The Pleasant View neighborhood has long been a desirable area to live in Provo due to its excellent location, peaceful streets and varied architectural history. The location is both a benefit and a challenge due to the immediate proximity of Brigham Young University, major arterial roads, and significant public transportation nodes.

Residential

1. Single-Family Homes

Maintain, protect and allow the turnover that naturally occurs in the viable and significant areas of one-family structures in the neighborhood. These areas are designated as single-family residential (R1) on the General Plan Map. Promote owner occupancy throughout the single-family home areas of the neighborhood. Restrict the Supplementary Residential and Accessory overlay zones from expanding beyond the current boundaries. Continue enforcement of zoning laws to ensure public safety and the quality of residential properties. Nonresidential uses such as commercial, public facilities, and professional office must not be allowed within the residential area on the north side of University Parkway between 450 East and 650 East. The single-family residential area between University Avenue and North Canyon Road south of 2200 North and north of Stadium Avenue must be maintained without loss of any property to higher-density residential or nonresidential development.

2. Condominiums, Apartments, and Performance Developments

The higher-density residential housing, such as condominiums, apartments, and performance developments, in the neighborhood provide a mix of housing opportunities. This housing is located in existing R2, RC, R3 and R4 zones. The expansion of these types of higher-density housing may occur into adjacent properties zoned General Commercial (GC) or Public Facility (PF) but not into property with a single-family (R1) use.

3. Commercial and Public Facility

Existing commercial and public facility developments should not be allowed to expand into the Residential areas (R) identified on the General Plan. Conversion of land designated Public Facility use to a Professional Office (PO) or Commercial (GC) use is not consistent with the long-term growth and sense of community in this neighborhood.

4. Traffic

Reduce cut-through traffic on local (residential) streets, provide appropriate speed limit controls and enforcement on local, collector and arterial streets, and improve pedestrian and bicycling access.

5. Maintain the current boundary between the higher-density uses such as Brigham Young University (BYU) in existing Public Facility zones and the single-family residential uses of the Pleasant View neighborhood. These boundaries best respect existing uses and protect both uses from the incompatibility of having high-density residential or commercial uses next to single-family residential uses.

Provost Neighborhood

1. Maintain the Public Facility (PF) General Plan designation for the detention basins along Slate Canyon Drive.

2. Maintain the one-family character of the neighborhood by:

a. Limiting development in the R designation to detached, one-family dwellings;

b. Enforcing relevant zoning laws to resist conversion of owner-occupied, one-family homes into two-family dwellings;

c. Being included in neighborhood revitalization initiatives.

3. Property in the Developmentally Sensitive designation is of notable concern for protection from inappropriate development.

4. Continue implementation of the South State Street Design Corridor.

Provost South Neighborhood

1. New, quality, one-family homes should be developed to provide adequate living space for growing families that wish to relocate to or remain within the Provost South neighborhood, including detached homes. Focus for new development for mixed housing types suitable for owner occupancy should develop using appropriate rezoning tools and provide adequate open space, amenities, buffering from nonresidential uses, and such architectural styles and orientation as to not give the appearance of multiple-family housing.

2. Encourage and/or maintain owner occupancy.

3. Evaluate the impacts of road designations to existing residents, especially collector designations. Evaluate the impacts of new development on street parking in constrained areas such as the east bench and implement traffic-calming measures and parking restrictions as determined appropriate.

4. Provide and upgrade infrastructure, including appropriately designed and located public recreational space.

5. Continue to implement the South State Street Design Corridor from the south City limits to 300 South for new development and redevelopment. Properties along the South State Street corridor should develop for quality businesses that are compatible with adjoining and nearby residential development, with focus on retail commercial and shopping center uses within a planned, well designed configuration.

6. The Slate Canyon Area Master Plan has been adopted as Key Land Use Policy for the area of the Provost South Neighborhood encompassed by the Plan.

Spring Creek Neighborhood

1. Ironton should be developed as an upscale business park, with industrial and commercial uses in a park-like atmosphere. Ironton Boulevard should connect to Larsen Parkway with adequate traffic control for the area.

2. Mixed-use development should be considered for the property along the west side of South State Street (US 89), between 900 South and 1860 South, after an area master plan has been completed. Multi-family housing may be developed within this area with or without the commercial elements if developed as part of a project redevelopment option (PRO), performance development (PD), or specific development plan (SDP) zone.

a. Flexibility in interpretation of these use boundaries and careful planning in establishing uses within the corridor, based on need and the desire to “soften” the frontage with limited areas of residential, are encouraged.

b. Mixed-use neighborhood centers should be focused near the intersections of 1320 South State and 1860 South State. The highest vertical mixed-use intensities should be closest to these mixed-use neighborhood centers with residential density and commercial intensities tapering off between the general centers.

c. Exceptions to this policy should be made for existing businesses, developed within the M-1 zone, that have made significant investment in the area and have upgraded their properties to comply more closely with the expectations of the adopted design corridor through enhanced landscaping, architectural improvements, and other standards.

3. Continue to implement the South State Street Design Corridor from the south City limits to 300 South for new development and redevelopment.

4. Properties along the South State Street corridor should develop for quality businesses that are compatible with adjoining and nearby residential development.

5. Provide public recreational space to service the residents of this neighborhood.

6. Evaluate the process by which CDBG eligible neighborhoods may effectively utilize revitalization initiatives.

University Neighborhood

1. The University is an exception to the guiding principles of the Southeast Area Neighborhood Council as there are no significant areas of one-family housing within its boundaries.

2. Due to its magnitude and unique characteristics, Brigham Young University (BYU) is significantly different from other public facility land uses. In particular, BYU-owned properties that lie within or in proximity to the boundaries of the adjoining Joaquin Neighborhood South Campus Planning Area should be reviewed for compatibility with key land use policies for campus-oriented student housing, mixed-use development, and ancillary services in the areas south and west of the BYU campus.

Wasatch Neighborhood

1. The Supplementary Residential Overlay Zone should not expand beyond its current boundaries.

2. Promote owner occupancy throughout the neighborhood.

3. Maintain all existing one-family residential areas of the neighborhood as one-family detached housing. Duplexes, twin homes, condominiums, and apartments are not compatible with the goals for this neighborhood.

4. A boundary between the higher-density uses of Brigham Young University (BYU) on the west side of 900 East and the one-family residential uses of the Wasatch neighborhood should be maintained. This plan designates 900 East as the boundary that best respects existing uses and protects both uses from the incompatibility of having high-density residential or commercial uses next to one-family residential uses.

5. Existing commercial development should not be allowed to expand to the degree that it encroaches into the Residential (R) General Plan designation.

6. Nonresidential uses such as commercial, public facilities, and professional office should not be allowed within the residential area on 900 East between Cedar Avenue and the Public Facilities (PF) Zone.

Map 1.8 - Southwest Area Neighborhood Council Map (PDF)

SOUTHWEST AREA NEIGHBORHOODS

Fort Utah

Lakewood

Lakeview North

Provo Bay

Lakeview South

Sunset

The Southwest Area Neighborhood Council consists of six neighborhoods: Fort Utah, Lakeview North, Lakeview South, Lakewood, Provo Bay, and Sunset. Key policies for the Southwest Area Neighborhood Council are listed below by neighborhood. Key policies for the Southwest Area Council are listed below, with policies to address issues shared, to some degree, within all Southwest Area neighborhoods, followed by policies of specific importance, by neighborhood.

Southwest Area Guiding Principles, Policies and Goals

Purpose

The purpose of these policies is to guide development in southwest Provo in order to promote a smart, sustainable, vibrant community that offers a high quality of life for current and future residents while respecting Provo’s agricultural heritage.

Policies

1. Preserve Provo’s agricultural heritage and support agriculture for as long as farmers choose to farm:

a. Approve the creation of a Provo Agricultural Commission to support local commercial and noncommercial agriculture.

b. Request that the Provo Agricultural Commission identify obstacles to the success of current and prospective farmers, including nontraditional farmers, and recommend ways to remove these obstacles.

c. Request that the Provo Agricultural Commission explore tools for agricultural preservation. These tools may include: conservation easements, transfers of development rights, community land trusts, a privately funded farmland trust fund, and Utah’s “Agricultural Protection” Program.

d. Encourage the Provo Agricultural Commission to improve the productive use of agricultural land.

e. Encourage Development-Supported Agriculture and Agritourism to help preserve Provo’s agricultural heritage.

f. Encourage our state lawmakers to increase funding for the LeRay McAllister Fund.

g. Protect agricultural operations from the impact of residential encroachment.

h. Identify agricultural land owners, have their properties listed on developmental maps to better avoid encroachment onto agricultural lands.

2. Preserve and Create Quality Usable Open Space

a. Update and utilize the Parks and Recreation Master Plan to provide developed parks and open space that satisfy a range of leisure and recreational needs.

b. Preserve and develop natural amenities for sustained enjoyment by the community. Examples include the Provo River and banks, the Provo River Delta, Utah Lake shoreline, and wetlands.

c. Provide parks and trails of different uses and sizes.

d. Encourage agritourism as a means to provide agriculturally themed open space.

e. Useable neighborhood open space should be an integral part of neighborhood design or combined to serve larger areas than the immediate development.

3. Encourage Sustainable Residential Development Patterns

a. Establish ordinances to require a mix of housing types, lot sizes, and designs to accommodate various stages of life.

b. Detached single-family homes should be the predominant housing type and the use of other types should augment and not detract from the single-family feel of the area.

c. Housing types should be mixed without barriers separating types or densities.

d. The scale and style of residences should enhance the surrounding area, regardless of housing type.

e. Create design standards for important road corridors in southwest Provo.

f. The overall density of the area should average four units to the acre.

4. Promote Development of Commercial Amenities and Employment Opportunities in Appropriate Locations

a. Regional commercial uses may be located adjacent to I-15 or within the Airport Related Activities district.

b. Neighborhood and Community Shopping zones may be located at or adjacent to arterial or collector streets.

c. Design, scale and intensity of commercial zones or properties should transition to adjacent residential uses to minimize impact on the residential use.

5. Create a Robust Transportation Network

a. Update the Transportation Master Plan to accommodate the changing needs of southwest Provo.

b. The planned collector road network should be built as development occurs. No development should interrupt the collector road network.

c. Update the Provo City Major and Local Street Plan to include a network of proposed local streets to ensure connectivity in the land between collector and arterial roads.

d. Utilize Complete Streets Policies to ensure all modes of transportation are considered.

e. Utilize the Transportation Master Plan to identify corridors that should have sufficient right-of-way to accommodate public transit.

f. Lakeview Parkway is to be maintained as an arterial roadway with limited access.

6. Require Proper Integration and Sequencing of Development

a. The full block should be considered when rezoning away from agricultural uses.

b. Conceptual Integrated Development Plan for the entire block should be required for zone change applications.

c. Discourage rezoning of land that is surrounded by agricultural zoning.

d. Development may be limited or deferred depending on the availability of adequate municipal infrastructure (such as sewer, storm drainage, water, etc.).

7. Restrict Development in Wetlands and Other Environmentally Sensitive Areas

a. Land south and west of the Lakeview Parkway up to Center Street (excepting the airport protection area) should be preserved for open space and agricultural uses.

b. No development should occur in flood-prone areas unless the risks can be mitigated. Plans for mitigation should be reviewed for adequacy by the Provo City Engineer and any State or Federal regulatory agency with jurisdiction to ensure that sensitive lands are appropriately developed to protect people, property or significant natural features. Mitigation plans should not adversely affect adjacent properties.

8. Future Land Uses Intent Statement

a. The Municipal Council of the City of Provo reaffirms our commitment to the Southwest Area Guiding Principles, Policies and Goals (General Plan 1.2.9) and the Southwest Area Future Land Use Map (General Plan, Appendix J) and adopts this statement to provide additional clarity regarding density and mixed lot sizes. This statement is intended to clarify the existing policies, set common expectations for the development community, staff, and City officials, and maximize the development potential of west Provo. A significant factor in the Council’s consideration of a rezone proposal in this area will be how the proposal meets the policies below.

b. Sewer capacity limits the west side to three units per acre gross in Residential areas (previously written as four units per acre and interpreted as net, see the Southwest Area Future Land Use Map). Given this constraint and the need for diverse housing options, Provo City encourages developers to submit ambitious, creative plans that provide a variety of lot and housing sizes to meet the varied needs of Provo residents, present and future.

c. Varied Lot Sizes Policies

i Recommendations for varied lot sizes

a Definitions of lot sizes

Small Lot

Medium Lot

Large Lot

< 8,000 sq ft

8,000-12,000 sq ft

> 12,000 sq ft

Lot sizes are subject to the minimum requirements for the zone.

b Table of ratios of lot sizes scaled for different developments

Acres in the development

Max Units (3 units/acre gross)

Small Lots

Medium Lots

Large Lots

≤10

30

N/A

N/A

N/A

11-19

33-57

25-75%*

25-75%*

25-75%*

20+

60-147

25-40%

25-40%

remainder

*Choose EITHER small and medium lots OR medium and large lots (choosing small and large is not desired)

c Green space

iGreen space is encouraged, especially for developments of 50 acres or more, and the Council may be inclined to approve projects with reduced average lot size based on green space inclusion.

iiDevelopers are responsible for maintaining green space. The use of graywater/non-potable water and waterwise landscaping is strongly encouraged.

dDevelopers may decide how to integrate the different lot sizes within their plans.

eWhen discussing units per acre on the west side of Provo, acreages should be understood to be gross, not net.

Models

These models show examples of the ratios of small, medium, and large lot sizes as described in the tables above and should not be interpreted as conveying any other recommendations.

ROOF COLORS

small lot (smaller than 8,000 square feet)

medium lot (8,000-12,000 square feet)

large lot (larger than 12,000 square feet)

11-19 Acres in Development

Acres in this model: 19.77
Total lots: 60

Small lots: 24 (40%)
Medium lots: 36 (60%)

20+ Acres in Development

Acres in this model: 37.48
Total lots: 110

Small lots: 42 (38%)
Medium lots: 40 (36%)
Large lots: 28 (25%)

20+ Acres in Development (with townhomes and open space)

Acres in this model: 37.48
Total lots: 110

Small lots: 42 (38%)
Medium lots: 40 (36%)
Large lots: 28 (25%)

Key land use policies for individual neighborhoods within the Southwest Area Council are listed, below, by neighborhood:

Fort Utah Neighborhood

1. Encourage 100 feet of public open space along the south side of the Provo River with the development of each property.

2. Center Street, between Geneva Road and Interstate 15, should be studied to capitalize on the Interstate 15 Center Street interchange. An analysis of appropriate mixed-use and commercial land uses, densities and other factors should guide the development of any zoning ordinances regulating this area.

Lakeview North Neighborhood

1. The property west and parallel of Geneva Road from Lakeshore Drive to 2000 North should be developed for uses compatible with the Residential (R) land use designation.

2. Property within and to the west of land located within the “AE” flood zone of the FEMA Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM) should receive the Provo City General Plan Map designation of Developmentally Sensitive (DS) and be subject to the same provisions as defined under the guiding principles for the SW Area.

3. Infrastructure needs should continue to be evaluated in order to resolve issues for existing and future residents, particularly where road conditions may be hazardous.

4. Continue to review for appropriately siting the airport access road and consider potential impacts to current residents along Lakeshore Drive.

5. The area between 1680 North and 2000 North, and between Geneva Road and I-15, which is zoned R1-20, should be developed as the current zoning allows or as a Specific Development Plan comprised primarily of single-family residential dwellings with a mix of housing types not to exceed the allowed density for the Southwest Area. No commercial uses should be permitted between Geneva Road and the Frontrunner Railroad Line.

Lakeview South Neighborhood

1. An infrastructure improvement plan should be considered for improvements to sidewalks, drainage, parks, landscaping, and traffic conditions.

2. All development within the Residential (R) designation should develop as one-family detached homes with lot sizes of one-half acre or greater, and may include limited animal rights unless a proposed subdivision is designed as a “cluster” type development, wherein smaller lots enable the developer to provide a significant amount of common open space.

3. Retail development should be discouraged within the Lakeview South Neighborhood.

4. The neighborhood supports the mobile home park known as Leisure Village to redevelop to consist of one-family detached, one-family semidetached (twin homes), and/or one-family attached (townhomes).

Lakewood Neighborhood

1. Continue to evaluate airport access and the potential impacts or benefits to existing residents resulting from planned road connections to the airport access road.

a. The need for northbound and southbound access on I-15 into the neighborhood should be evaluated and implemented if warranted.

b. The collector road system should seek to make minimal impacts on existing farming/agricultural properties.

c. 500 West should be carefully evaluated as a collector road and appropriate design measures should be incorporated into the design to mitigate detriments to the neighborhood.

2. Continue to work toward infrastructure improvements to serve existing residents and to ensure that infrastructure is in place prior to new development, to provide adequate storm drainage, street connections and appropriately designed and located public park space.

3. New development should be appropriately incorporated to respect the rural feel of the Lakewood area, to complement and enhance the neighborhood, and to provide adequate living space for growing families that wish to relocate to or remain within the Lakewood neighborhood.

4. Provide sidewalks where they currently do not exist.

5. Evaluate environmental impacts prior to approving any new development in the Lakewood Neighborhood.

6. The Lakewood Park expansion should be implemented when resources allow.

7. Mitigate traffic and on-street parking impacts from Footprinters Park.

Provo Bay Neighborhood

Goals of the Provo Bay Neighborhood

1. Preserve the current open feel of the neighborhood.

2. Achieve a balance of sizes and styles when new one-family homes are developed.

3. Provide better recreational opportunities and take advantage of recreational opportunities afforded by Utah Lake.

4. Evaluate and encourage retail development in appropriate areas that would provide needed neighborhood services.

5. Evaluate the feasibility of locating new arterial roads in locations that are not adjacent to current residential development.

Key Land Use Policies – Provo Bay Neighborhood

1. Discourage residential development west of 3110 West to avoid airport flight paths and the airport protection area, as identified in the Airport Master Plan.

2. Achieve a balance of sizes and types of one-family residential development. New developments should complement and enhance the neighborhood, providing adequate living space for growing families that wish to relocate to or remain within the Provo Bay Neighborhood.

3. Enhance recreational opportunities and take advantage of the proximity to Utah Lake. These include but are not limited to developing recreation access to Provo Bay and trails along Lakeview Parkway. The purchase of Utah Lake State Park from the State should be evaluated and considered. Access from the proposed West Side Connector to Provo Bay for canoeing, bird watching, and fishing, along with a paved trail system to provide residents with biking, walking and other activities along the Provo Bay shoreline should be considered.

4. Retail development should be encouraged at proper locations within the neighborhood, such as along Center Street and Lakeview Parkway. Retail should include but not be limited to grocery and banking services.

5. The area west of 1600 West and South of 600 South that borders the proposed West Side Connector road should be developed as a Specific Development Plan consisting of commercial, retail and residential use. This Specific Development Plan should be initiated by the City and not left entirely up to developers and landowners. This property, if properly planned, could have a combination of retail and residential uses.

6. Study the feasibility of maintaining 3110 West as a residential arterial road and align Lakeview Parkway to the edge of the airport development area as it proceeds north.

7. Conduct a study to identify appropriate land uses within the Airport Related Activities designation.

Sunset Neighborhood

1. The area between 600 South and 1150 South from 1100 West to 1600 West should be developed with uses compatible with the Residential (R) land use designation. The following guidelines should be considered in the development of this area:

a. The area should be developed (allowably in phases under multiple ownerships) as a whole and integrated plan using the SDP process as described in the SW Area Guiding Principles and Goals.

b. Those currently wishing to maintain animal rights should do so through the application of a Residential Agricultural (RA) zone on their property.

c. The area should develop with a rural character in mind and should incorporate a balanced distribution of lot sizes, which should be interspersed amongst each other and should not exceed density limitations expressed in the SW Area Guiding Principles and Goals.

d. Equestrian-based facilities and trail systems are highly encouraged.

e. Footprinters Park should be expanded to add additional neighborhood recreational facilities.

f. Commercial and nonrecreational public facilities are currently not encouraged but may be considered if designed as part of the SDP process and demonstrated that they will be an asset to the development and surrounding neighborhood.

g. Road connectivity is encouraged in the design of the SDP. Cul-de-sacs will be highly discouraged unless it is demonstrated that alternatives do not exist.

2. Evaluate opportunities to expand public park services to better serve the Sunset Neighborhood and to resolve traffic, parking and light pollution impacts to neighborhoods in the vicinity of the ball park.

3. An infrastructure improvement plan should be considered for improvements to sidewalks, drainage, parks, landscaping, and traffic conditions.